Domestic Violence Illustrated by Display

About 500 T-shirts were hung shoulder-to-shoulder in clothesline fashion on the outside quad of the University Student Union at Cal State Northridge on Thursday.

The Clothesline Project, a collection of T-shirts made by survivors and friends and family members of victims of sexual violence, was displayed at the third annual Ending Violence Against Women Conference.

“The number 500 really means nothing unless you see how many shirts there are and it’s quite overwhelming when you see it in person,” said Jean Morrison, conference coordinator. “Each shirt represents an experience, and in some cases, a woman who has died.”

“It shows that too many women are being battered,” said senior business major Sossy Dombourian. “It’s amazing because I personally don’t know of anyone being battered, but when you see all those T-shirts, you realize that it’s a big problem.”

About 700 CSUN students and 300 community members attended the daylong event sponsored by the CSUN Student Health Center.

Morrison said the goal of the conference was to enhance community knowledge on violence prevention education through a series of workshops on issues concerning women and their families, such as relationship violence, public attitudes on rape, the relationship between substance abuse and violence, date rape and domestic violence.

“We are trying to give each community member here today the tools they need to work with each other to prevent violence,” Morrison said. “Unless we have everyone working together, this problem is not going to end.”

 

Posted in Los Angeles Times
Article Link: http://articles.latimes.com/1998/mar/27/local/me-33375

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Conference Examines Domestic Violence

A daylong conference exploring violence against women and its aftereffects is scheduled Thursday at Cal State Northridge.

The 1997 Ending Violence Against Women Conference, sponsored by the San Fernando Valley chapter of the National Organization for Women, will also feature the first statewide display of the Clothesline Project, an international collection of T-shirts decorated by survivors, family members and friends of victims.

Conference workshops will include sessions with community activists, professional advocates and local government officials dealing with domestic violence, date rape and divorce mediation.

“Over the last 10 years, violence against women has become much more visible due to the education efforts of women’s groups,” said Jean Morrison, president of the Valley chapter of NOW.

“But people are still having a hard time talking about violence and we will continue to need seminars such as this to get as much exposure as possible about this problem.”

The workshops, which start at 8 a.m. in the university’s student union, 18111 Nordhoff St., are free to the public, however phone-in reservations are requested.

For more information, call NOW at (818) 769-2035.

 

Posted in Los Angeles Times
Article Link: http://articles.latimes.com/1997-03-31/local/me-43842_1_domestic-violence

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Jean Morrison

Jean Morrison

“If our goal is to change public attitudes, we have to go out and do that with repeated messages over a long term, and we have to be creative about those messages.”

 

NAME: Jean Morrison

AGE: 38

HOME: Canyon Country

PROFESSION: Owner of Morrison Communications, which specializes in media relations, event planning and nonprofit development; volunteer co-founder since 1993 of the local chapter of the “Clothesline Project,” a traveling display of decorated T-shirts created by women who have been sexually, physically or emotionally abused.

LATEST ACCOMPLISHMENT: One of 10 “Women of the Year” in 2000 selected by the Los Angeles County Commission for Women, for her work to end violence against women.

GOALS FOR 2001: To move the local chapter of the “Clothesline Project” out of her garage and into a Van Nuys office, making it more accessible for victims. The move will enable her to better document the 800 T-shirts in the collection that demonstrate powerful messages of hurt and healing from victims. She also plans to launch the San Fernando Valley Youth Violence Prevention Network, a resource of statistics, contacts and information for police, educators, parents and community groups trying to fight youth violence.

 

Posted in Los Angeles Times
Article Link: http://articles.latimes.com/2000/dec/26/local/me-4753

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